Archive for Media

Chicken Little, Wishful Thinking and the 24 Hour News Cycle

chickenOne frightening and frustrating trend we’ve seen since the 24-hour news cycle became a reality (meaning – since we have all gotten used to, and expect, to get our news updated at anytime, day or night, everywhere) – credibility has taken a nose dive. We want to think we can count on the “facts” as reported, but too often they get blended with the not-quite-facts, the incorrectly extrapolated facts, the just-plain-wrong facts – and of course, pure fiction.

The “Who Can You Believe?” question became even more acute over the last week with the realization that NBC News anchor Brian Williams, who I have always liked and would still like to invite for dinner, thinks it’s OK to embellish the truth. If you would believe his stories, you would think he had been shot down in a helicopter or watched bodies floating in the New Orleans French Quarter after Katrina. Neither is true.

Now, Brian Williams doesn’t give patient empowerment advice.  But other so, and like Brian, they come across as so gosh-darn believable!  The problem is, sometimes they aren’t, and we have to do some due diligence to figure out when they are, or when they aren’t, when their advice is useful, and when it’s not, or even when it’s downright dangerous.

Do I think they are intentionally leading us astray?  Sometimes. Do I think they intentionally give us bad advice?  Sometimes.  Do I think we need to confirm their advice with another, more objective information?  You bet I do. Too often what we see is more Chicken Little or Wishful Thinking and not something we should put any stock in at all.

So where can we patients turn? How do we know what’s objective, what isn’t, what’s worthy of our time, and who we can believe?

That’s Gary Schwitzer’s entire focus – so let me tell you about Gary’s work.

Gary founded HealthNewsReview.org many years ago.  As a journalism professor, teaching his students how to write informational and objective news stories, he was appalled at the shift in direction being taken by large news organizations. That is – they glom on to “news” that isn’t really news, because they think it will catch someone’s eye (or ears) – and not because it’s really useful. Further, sometimes they simply regurgitate a press release from a pharmaceutical or medical device company, like “Research Shows that Our New Drug Cures Cancer!”  The problem is, too many people believe it.

But smart patients don’t believe any of it until they have investigated further and assessed its veracity.

I encourage you to take a look at Health News Review to see exactly the criteria Gary’s reviewers use to assess health and medical news stories. You might also be interested in his post about conflicts-of-interest among national TV anchors and medical correspondents. Eye-opening.

Gary’s criteria for assessing news stories are front and center, right on his homepage.  Additional information can be found here:  How to Assess Medical Studies

………………………………..

Do you have advice or a story to share that illustrates this post?  Please share in the comments below.

Want more great tips for smart, empowered patients?
Read my book:  You Bet Your Life! The 10 Mistakes Every Patient Makes (How to Fix Them to Get the Healthcare You Deserve)

 

Posted in: Follow the Money, Health /Medical Consumerism, Media, Medical and Research Studies, Patient Empowerment, Patient Safety, Pharmaceutical Drugs, Politics and Medicine, You Bet Your Life!

Leave a Comment (0) →

Looking for Trisha Torrey, (former) About.com Patient Empowerment Expert?

messydesk

 

You found me!  Here I am!

And I’m moving back in, here to my personal blog. Home. Where I started writing about Patient Empowerment in 2005.

It’s been awhile since I’ve been “home.” Look around!  You can see how dusty it is. I’ve got to wash the curtains and get them back up. Clearly the place needs to be swept and vacuumed.  Those are all tasks I’ll get squared away in the next few days. Give me a week and I may even get some new paint on the walls.

Are you wondering why I’ve moved back home? 

Simple answer – it’s because I was sent packing.

Most of my regulars know about my work at About.com Patient Empowerment.  I started writing for About.com in late 2007 and in all, I published more than 800 articles on topics from how to be an empowered patient, to how to get your medical records, to how to look up CPT codes, to how to deal with an arrogant doctors and much, much more.  In addition to those 800 articles, I wrote more than 1000 blog posts!  And I would still be writing and publishing there today… except that….

I was terminated June 30.  Gone. Kaput. Right in the middle of my contract year.  They decided they didn’t want me anymore and cut me off. Chop chop.

If you want details, here they are.  But that’s not the point of this post.

This post is to tell you that I’m going to lead by example.  That is – throughout my patient empowerment work, the advice I always give to you is to stick up for yourself and to be sure to take responsibility for the situation you’ve been dealt.  Don’t take crap from anyone.  YOU are the most important stakeholder in your own care and to get what you need, you need to take the lead.

So that’s exactly what I’m doing here.  As much as I loved my work with About.com, it’s no longer an option.  So I’m moving back home, gonna spiff up the place, and will begin publishing again right here to keep my commitment to helping you, my readers, get what you need from the healthcare system.

Here are some of my plans:

  • I’ll be writing articles just like I was writing them before – so – what topics would you like to see?
  • One of the recent changes About.com had made was to take away YOUR opportunity to comment on articles and blog posts.  By publishing here, I’ll be restoring that capability.  So please do comment!  I learn from you every time.
  • In the past two years I was sending out only 5-6 newsletters a year from this personal site, but now that there will be no more newsletters coming from me at about.com* I’ll begin sending from here.  You can help too, by letting your friends know.  Here’s the link you need to get signed up.

Together we’ll weather the healthcare system together, whether About.com wants to help in that effort or not.  I’m still Every Patient’s Advocate. They can’t take that away from me.  And I’m here for you.

Are you with me?  Great!

(Now could one of you big strong guys help me move my desk over there – under the window?  It’s a beautiful day, and I don’t want to miss the sunshine.)

I’ll be back soon with some usable healthcare information.  All suggestions welcome 🙂

__________________________________________

*about.com will likely continue to send patient empowerment newsletters, and for the foreseeable future, they will be my articles. But there will be nothing new that hasn’t been sent out in a newsletter previously. Feel free to unsubscribe if it gets to be redundant.

More:  At About.com, Experts Are Disposable

Posted in: Media, Patient Empowerment, Self Help

Leave a Comment (7) →

Time to Put a Stop to Drive-by-Doctoring

As many of my readers know, I speak at meetings and conferences fairly frequently, and most often to groups of patients and caregivers. The focus of the talks I give is usually on a patient empowerment topic – ranging from how to communicate with your doctor, to how to stay safe in the hospital, to a dozen other topics….

Every time I speak to groups of patients, I ask the question, “Have any of you ever felt rushed during a doctor appointment?”

The overwhelming majority raise their hands, and nod, and often turn to the person sitting next to them, poised to share their latest horror story about being rushed, which is often the case after they’ve waited in the waiting room for way too long.  A double whammy.

Frustrating. Maddening. Unfair.  And now, statistically accurate, including its negative effect on both our health and our wallets.

Newsweek Magazine published an article this week called The Doctor Will See You – If You’re Quick.  Written by Shannon Brownlee (author of Overtreated), it quantifies the problem of, what I call, “drive by doctoring” – the concept that we barely see the doctor walk IN the exam room door, before the doctor has retreated back out that door, asking the empty hallway (because he’s no longer engaged with the patient at all), “Do you have any more questions?”

The point to the article (which is excellent – you really should take the time to read it in its entirety), is that over the past few decades, the trusting relationship that used to exist between patients and their doctors has eroded to almost non-existent, and has resulted in bigger problems for both parties.  And both parties are suffering.  Patients don’t like it, and their doctors don’t like it either.

Or (another one of my sayings) – American healthcare is not about health or care. It’s about sickness and money – using sickness to make money.

Here are some of the points that support that:

  • The ideal patient panel (number of patients) for primary care doctors should be fewer than 1,800 patients in order to provide the kind of care patients need.  Today, the average number of patients per PCP is 2,300. And for “Medicaid Mills”, the panel is more like 3,000.
  • To speed things along, doctors interrupt their patients an average of 23 seconds into the answer to the question, “Why are you here today?”
  • One study showed that the average amount of time spent providing “critical information” to patients is 1.3 minutes (yes – that’s MINUTES.)  Your quality or quantity of life only deserves 1.3 minutes?

To those of us who understand this madness, and attempt to be smart patients, there is nothing new here. But the information is beneficial to us for a few reasons:

First – because our world is being driven more and more by data, and not simply our observations and stories. With the quantification of these kinds of problems, the powers-that-be will have to look at solutions, because no nation can afford sicker and poorer people.

Second – because this kind of information is a good reminder to us all that it’s us SMART, EMPOWERED PATIENTS who will manage to get the best of a system that has the capability to be great, but is growing worse every day.

We can’t help those who won’t help themselves… but we can be the ones who will STOP this erosion, and help ourselves.

•  Helping ourselves will mean we find the right doctors – the ones who WILL communicate with us. (A reminder that no doctor is average – they are either better than, or worse than, whatever average is. As empowered patients, we search out the “better than”.)

•  Helping ourselves means we place ourselves squarely in the middle of our own medical decision-making – we don’t default to letting someone else make them for us.

•  Helping ourselves means we find information to support our decisions, making sure it’s credible and reliable.

•  Helping ourselves may mean that we try to manage our relationships with our doctors on our own, or it may mean we ask someone else to help us.

•  Helping ourselves will mean understanding the roll the pursuit of profit takes on our health – we will understand the concept of Follow the Money and why that makes us poorer and sicker.

It took decades for the healthcare system to devolve to what it is today (just in time for us baby boomers to utilize it in huge numbers with, in too many cases, horrible outcomes.) It will take decades more to fix it.

Most of us don’t have decades to wait – and for that reason alone, we must engage in our own care.  We can’t afford, for our health OR our wallets, to let drive-by-doctoring take its toll on us or our loved ones.

……………………………………………………………………………………..

Want more Patient Empowerment?
Find hundreds of articles at:

Every Patient’s Advocate

About.com Patient Empowerment

and sign up for my 2x per month newsletter
full of Patient Empowerment Tips.

Posted in: Doctor Communication, Follow the Money, Health /Medical Consumerism, Healthcare Quality, Media, Medical and Research Studies, Patient Empowerment, Patient Tools, Self Help

Leave a Comment (2) →

Why Rob a Bank When You Can Make More Money by Counterfeiting Drugs?

Want to make millions of dollars quickly while risking only a few months in prison if (and that’s a big IF) you’re caught?  It’s not difficult at all. Just set yourself up as a distributor of counterfeit drugs in the United States.

This week’s announcement by the FDA that a counterfeit version of Avastin, a chemotherapy drug that is used for several kinds of cancers and tumors (lung cancer, kidney cancer, colon and rectum cancers – but no longer for breast cancer since approval was removed last year) has been found across the country, infused into the national drug supply, raises plenty of questions about how that could possibly happen.

It was followed by an interesting article in USA Today which partially answers the question.  Counterfeiting is a multi-billion dollar business that is on the rise because it’s so lucrative, and because the penalties are so… well… inconsequential.  I mean – would you be willing to spend no more than six months in jail if you could make millions of dollars for use when you got out?  (Even if you would answer no! I don’t want to go to jail!…  I’ll ask you this…. what if your child had treatable cancer and you had no insurance?  Just sayin’ …)

Avastin isn’t the only drug that may be counterfeited.  Any high cost drug that can be watered down, or manufactured to “look” right even if it is manufactured without its expensive ingredients, is a target for counterfeiters.  Lipitor and Viagra are probably the most apt to be counterfeit, but others like drugs used to treat HIV and AIDs, or diabetic drugs, or weight loss drugs, are likely targets for counterfeiters, too.

So what happens if you are somehow treated using a counterfeit instead of the real drug?  Maybe nothing. Or maybe you die. Or anything in between. The problem is, for the most part, we patients have very few ways we can detect whether a drug is real or fake.

Katherine Eban, in her book, Dangerous Doses, tells the stories of people who died from receiving infusions of counterfeit Procrit.  The conventional wisdom on this most recent discovery of fake Avastin is that there was nothing in the counterfeit version that was dangerous, and it’s difficult to tell within a regimen of 18-20 doses a cancer patient might receive over six months whether one “missed” infusion of the active ingredients has a long-term effect.

The bigger picture problem is that our drug supply is not being well enough protected by the FDA, which is tasked with protecting us. The FDA has no backbone when it comes to protecting us from bogus, counterfeit drug distributors who appear to be selling “real” drugs, but target greedy doctors, pharmacies and hospitals that are so willing to buy “discounted” drugs for their patients, knowing that there will be more profit in their reimbursements.  Experts estimate that about 1% of our drug supply is counterfeit.  That means that 1 out of every 100 administered drugs may be counterfeit, too.

One answer to this is an electronic pedigree system, meaning, from the time the drug is manufactured, until it is given to the patient, it is followed and logged using a bar code type system. If such a system was in place, then even us patients would have a way to double check that the drugs being given to us are the real drugs they are supposed to be.

So why doesn’t the FDA insist on the development of such a system?  Well, actually, they have. But again, they have no teeth, and so far, no backbone.  Every time they raise the issue, the drug companies and drug distributors begin to wail about the added cost to the system.  (Surprise!  Follow the money!)  And so, nothing gets done.

Like other issues in healthcare, it looks like little will happen to improve this system until something horrible befalls someone famous; someone who can actually override the special interests in Washington and insist on development of this electronic pedigree system.

Until then, here is information to help us patients do what we can to protect ourselves from counterfeit drugs.

……………………………………………………………………………………

Want More Patient Empowerment?
Find Hundreds of Articles at:

Every Patient’s Advocate

…and…
sign up for 2x per month newsletters of
Patient Empowerment Tips

 

Posted in: Follow the Money, Health /Medical Consumerism, Healthcare Quality, Hospitals, Media, Patient Empowerment, Patient Safety, Patient Tools

Leave a Comment (1) →

The 2012 Elections and the Issue of Healthcare Reform

This column first appeared
in the Syracuse Post Standard
January 17, 2012

During both the 2008 and 2010 elections, the issue of reforming the American healthcare system was the focus of overwhelming amounts of misinformation and disinformation.

Remember the email about Senior Death Panels?  It explained that the healthcare reform bill would allow Medicare to save money by refusing to pay for lifesaving treatment for older Americans.  Of course, it wasn’t true.

Another email stated that the Muslim belief in dhimmitude (surrender or appeasement) would mean American Muslims would be allowed to opt-out of the mandatory insurance rule. Also untrue.

Both inflammatory statements were horribly upsetting!  But it wasn’t a huge leap to figure out who wanted us to believe them.

Now primary season is here again, and some candidates continue to focus on repealing the Affordable Care Act (healthcare reform).  Whether or not you believe healthcare reform should be the law of the land, you owe it to yourself, and those you influence, to separate facts from fiction.

If someone shares “facts” with you that seem inflammatory, upsetting or don’t make sense, then there may be something askew. It’s possible they are true. Or, they may be only partially true, subjective interpretations of the truth, or even out-and-out lies.

Three websites provide neutral, objective analyses of political statements for our review. The best way to determine the veracity of information about healthcare reform, or any other political statements, is to scrutinize them at one, two or all three sites.

One site is the Pulitzer Prize winning Politifact.com. Its “Truth-o-Meter” scores statements on a range from True, to Flip-Flop, to Pants-on-Fire, along with supporting documentation for how the score was determined.

Factcheck.org is provided by the Annenberg Public Policy Center.  One section focuses specifically on email rumors.  Another section examines statements made by candidates and their high-profile supporters  to establish their accuracy.

Finally, Snopes.com is a great resource, too. While it originally examined only urban legends, in recent years it has expanded into political claims as well.

If you see, hear or read a statement from any organization or individual during the election season or any other time, be sure to review it carefully before you share it with someone else.  You don’t want to foolishly believe things that aren’t true, nor do you want to share misinformation or disinformation with others.  Using one of these statement-auditing websites will help you sort out the real facts.

Here is more information about reviewing email claims:

 How to Confirm or Debunk Claims
Made in Email, Blogs or Social Media

From Conspiracy Theories to Bogus Claims
How Can You Ascertain the Truth?

Have you confirmed or debunked a political email claim?
Share your findings!

……………………………………………………………………………………

Want More Patient Empowerment?
Find Hundreds of Articles at:

Every Patient’s Advocate

…and…
sign up for 2x per month newsletters of
Patient Empowerment Tips

Posted in: Follow the Money, Health Insurance, Media, Patient Tools, Politics and Medicine, Self Help

Leave a Comment (2) →
Page 1 of 23 12345...»